Making the most of your summer vacation with your children

One of the main reasons for a vacation is to experience new activities in a different setting than the everyday, whether that means new foods, cultures, sights, sounds…the possibilities are limitless! Undoubtedly, when you aren't able to spend all the time you want with your children during the hectic school years, there's likely added pressure to make every moment of your summer vacation with your offspring fun, interesting and memorable. To ensure the time away accomplishes all that you hope for, it's important to plan ahead.

Keep these tips in mind when organizing a summer vacation with your children so the planning for and enjoyment of the time together will make great memories to last both of your lifetimes:

  • Determine your budget. This is important because while you want to have fun with your child, you also want to be able to afford wherever you've elected to visit.
  • Clear the dates of your proposed trip with your former spouse. That includes mentioning any unusual activities your child might participate in. If your divorce papers prohibit certain activities, don't plan on doing them, even if you are out of town and think no one back home will find out.
  • If your children aren't too familiar with your family, be sensitive to the possibility your child might not be too comfortable visiting them. Certainly that doesn't mean to avoid those visits, but it would be wise to accommodate your child in case he or she needs time to adjust.
  • If possible, parents should plan the trip's itinerary together. That cohesion will reassure your child they needn't feel guilty about enjoying any aspect of the vacation or that maybe they're doing something the absent parent would not approve of.
  • Be certain to take all important medical information with you on the trip. Particularly if you're not the parent whose name appears on your child's medical insurance card, it's wise to take a copy of your divorce papers, too. That can establish your role as the child's parent so there are no questions as to your authority to make medical decisions.
  • Beware of separation anxiety, especially in younger children. Perhaps allowing the child to bring a favorite picture of the absent parent, a small gift that parent gave them at some point, or even cute notes the parent wrote ahead of time to be opened at various times throughout the trip will lessen the child's anxiety about being separated from one of their parents, even if it's only temporary. This is particularly true with younger children.

Preparing for a summer vacation with children of divorced parents might be a bit more challenging than it is when parents are still married, but open communication and diligent planning can lessen the anxiety and increase the likelihood of a fun, safe and memorable experience for all.

Individuals throughout the DFW Metroplex contemplating divorce or who have been served with divorce papers, and have children issues, including child custody, visitation and child support issues, can turn to Pfister, Borserine & Associates for experienced help. We offer accurate information and experienced advice, from a legal team of John J. Pfister Jr. and Charity Borserine, family law attorneys with more than 30 years of combined experience, including Mr. Pfister, who is a Board Certified Family Law Specialist (certified by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization). We will provide you with your options and guard your legal interests. Email us or call today at 972-712-6700.

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